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2 Times George Washington Was Protected by God

We already know that George Washington was a moral man and an inspiring leader, but perhaps he knew more than we realized about his divine role in establishing the United States as a promised land where the Restoration could unfold. Evidence suggests that not only was Washington protected and guided by the Lord, but he was aware that God had a greater purpose for America.

In 1770, at the request of the governor of Virginia, George Washington led a small party in the Ohio wilderness to survey lands. While they camped in the woods near the Kanawha River, a small group of peaceful Indians entered their camp. Though surprised, Washington stood and greeted them politely. It became clear to Washington that the leader was an elderly man—the Grand Sachem, as he was called. And it soon became clear that the Grand Sachem, after hearing that Washington was in the territory, had traveled quite a distance to lay eyes on him.

At this time in history, Washington was not the man of fame he would one day become. Indeed, the Revolution and his role in it were still years away. But as the chief began to speak, Washington realized why he had come looking for him.

The Bulletproof Soldier

“I have traveled a long and weary path that I might see the young warrior of the great battle.” The chief signaled to Washington, and Washington understood instantly. Though only 23 years old when this great battle took place during the French and Indian War, Washington had fought bravely and had even been commissioned as a colonel.

The Grand Sachem recounted, “By the waters of the Monongahela, we met the soldiers of the King beyond the Seas, who came to drive from the land my French Brothers. . . . Like a blind wolf they walked into our trap. . . . It was a day when the white man’s blood mixed with the streams of our forests, and ’twas then I first beheld this Chief.”

After pointing to Washington, the old man continued, “I, who can bring the leaping squirrel from the top of the highest tree with a single shot, fired at this warrior more times than I have fingers. Our bullets killed his horse, knocked the war bonnet from his head, pierced his clothes, but ’twas in vain; a Power mightier far than we shielded him from harm.”

After a brief pause, the old Indian opened his mouth again to make his concluding remarks, or, better said, his concluding prophecy:

“The Great Spirit protects that man and guides his destinies. He will become the chief of many nations, and a people yet unborn will hail him as the founder of a mighty empire. I am come to pay homage to the man who is the particular favorite of heaven and who can never die in battle.”

After this same battle, Washington had put his own thoughts on paper. “By the miraculous care of Providence,” he wrote, “I have been protected beyond all human probability or expectation; for I had four bullets through my coat and two horses shot under me and yet escaped unhurt, although death was leveling my companions on every side of me.”

Indeed, the Lord was preserving Washington for a specific purpose—to ensure the establishment of a nation where the restored gospel could come forth and flourish. And heaven would not let him fail.