A generation gap in understanding porn of today

It is hard to talk about pornography without being pornographic.

That's why when Jill C. Manning, a marriage and family therapist based in Colorado, talks about the seedy industry she refers to, of all things, Pong.

Released in 1972, Pong was a first generation video game based on the sport of table tennis. Players moved two lines up and down on a black and white video screen to intersect a dot (representing the ball) that moved from one side of the screen to the other.

People today who remember Pong probably have no desire to play it.

Why? Unlike Pong, the first video game to achieve widespread popularity in both the arcade and home markets, today's video games contain real-life imagery, sound and graphics.

Players can personalize the games for their moods and desires. They are not limited to competitors in the same room sharing the same screen but can, through the Internet, challenge opponents in different countries.

And so it is with pornography, said Manning.

Although pornography is nothing new, the proximity of the sex industry to the public is new, said Manning, who testified before a U.S. Senate subcommittee in 2005 on the harms of pornography and is author of the book, "What's the Big Deal about Pornography: A Guide for the Internet Generation."

Read the rest of this story at deseretnews.com
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