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February 2015 Visiting Teaching Message: The Attributes of Jesus Christ--Without Sin

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Image from LDS.org.

The Attributes of Jesus Christ: Without Sin

Our Savior, Jesus Christ, was the only one capable of making an atonement for mankind. “Jesus Christ, the Lamb without blemish, willingly laid Himself on the altar of sacrifice and paid the price for our sins,” said President Dieter F. Uchtdorf, Second Counselor in the First Presidency.1 Understanding that Jesus Christ was without sin can help us increase our faith in Him and strive to keep His commandments, repent, and become pure.

“Jesus was … a being of flesh and spirit, but He yielded not to temptation (see Mosiah 15:5),” said Elder D. Todd Christofferson of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles. “We can turn to Him … because He understands. He understands the struggle, and He also understands how to win the struggle."

Read the rest of the February 2015 visiting teaching message.

Supplement: Read the following excerpt from Elder Royden G. Derrick's talk "The Beautitudes and Our Perfection" from the April 1977 general conference.

Each of the Beatitudes represents a specific step in our orderly progression towards perfection, and teaches us how to qualify ourselves for exaltation, for the Bible concludes the chapter on the Beatitudes with the words, “Be ye therefore perfect, even as your Father which is in heaven is perfect.” (Matt. 5:48.)

The Savior began his sermon saying, “Blessed are the poor in spirit: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.” (Matt. 5:3; italics added.) When the Savior gave the same sermon to the people of ancient America, he said, “Blessed are the poor in spirit who come unto me, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.” (3 Ne. 12:3.) “Who come unto me”—that clarifies the meaning. . . .

When we love the Lord we will submit ourselves to his plan and serve him with all of our heart, might, mind, and strength. This is the first step. We must take it in order to qualify for exaltation. The miracle of change begins when we come forth with a contrite spirit.

Read the rest of Elder Derrick's talk at LDS.org.