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How LDS Artists Are Helping to Create a Side of Charlie Brown No One Has Ever Seen Before

MR says: Many BYU graduates and Latter-day Saints have been working diligently on the Peanuts movie, which came out November 6, taking on the task of creating Snoopy's fantasy world and Charlie Brown in 3D. 

He’s an icon who has appeared in the Sunday paper for more than half a century, but there are still some sides of Charlie Brown the public has yet to see. For example: the back of his head. 

This was the challenge facing a team of talented artists at Blue Sky Studios (owned by 20th Century Fox), which included BYU Illustration professor David Dibble and six other alumni from the BYU Department of Design. The group was tasked with transforming the two-dimensional world of Charles Schulz’s characters into a three-dimensional feature-length film.

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“In the 1950s, Charlie Brown comic strips were a little more 3D and had some depth and perspective in the drawings,” Dibble said. “But in the 70s, 80s and 90s, not only did Schulz progressively flatten down the space, he stuck a flat brick wall in front of the characters in many scenes to eliminate depth. We never see the back of Charlie Brown’s head, we don’t see him from a three-quarter angle. He’s always drawn from a profile view or straight on.”

Lead image from BYU News of Professor David Dibble.

Charles M. Schulz's Peanuts comic strip franchise, the most successful of all time, forever changed the industry. For more than half a century, the endearing, witty insights brought to life by Charlie Brown, Snoopy, Linus, and Lucy have caused newspaper readers and television viewers across the globe to laugh, sigh, gasp, and ponder. A Charlie Brown Religion explores one of the most provocative topics Schulz broached in his heartwarming work—religion.

Read the rest of this story at news.byu.edu