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LDS Olympic Medalist Is Helping Girls to Love Their Bodies & Their Size

The strongest woman in America and one of the strongest women in the world is showing girls everywhere that they can be healthy, successful, and love themselves at every size.

Latter-day Saint Sarah Robles became the first U.S. weightlifter to win an Olympic medal in 16 years. Recently, LA Times featured Olympian medalists Sarah Robles and Michelle Carter for the ways they've been redefining stereotypical female body types.

“To challenge ‘normal’ ideals is an important thing,” Robles told the LA Times. “It’s cool to be me. I’m big and strong and putting it all for good use.”

“I didn’t have to conform my body or my ideals or my looks to get where I am,” Robles told the LA Times. “I have a bronze medal and I was able to be myself, embrace my body, do the things I’m naturally fitted to do to help make my dreams come true.”

At 5 feet 10 inches and 315 pounds, Sarah Robles hopes that while little girls all over the world are watching small gymnasts, sleek runners, or muscular swimmers win medals, they also see women like her who fit another body type but are powerful and successful. Robles loves her body and hopes that women and girls everywhere can love theirs too.

“I didn’t have to conform my body or my ideals or my looks to get where I am,” Robles told the LA Times. “I have a bronze medal and I was able to be myself, embrace my body, do the things I’m naturally fitted to do to help make my dreams come true.”

But this sense of confidence hasn't always been easy for Robles to find. In elementary school, she remembers a girl calling her fat and hitting her in the face.

“I got bullied as a kid, and one of my motivations is to not let anyone else feel the way I felt about me,” she said. “No one should have to hate themselves, doubt their abilities, change what they like or who they are. If I can be another voice of reason and kindness to help silence everyone else who says something negative about you, that’s a good thing.”

Robles has made it a goal to help little girls of all body types and responds to notes from girls who are bullied at school. But finding a healthy balance is something Robles continually has to keep in check. In fact, after her 2012 Olympic appearance she spent some time rebuilding her overall health. 

Robles credits her recent victory to her focus on emotional and spiritual health as well as physical performance. Before the Games, she received a priesthood blessing and recently received her endowments in July.

Read more at LA Times.

Lead image from LA Times.
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