35826

14-Year-Old LDS "The Voice" Contestants Wins Voice Battle, Shares Her Faith

by | Mar. 22, 2017

Mormon Life

One of the three LDS The Voice contestants, Aaliyah Rose, won her voice battle against Savannah Leighton while singing “Treat You Better” by Shawn Mendes as part of the battles premiere yesterday. Still on team Gwen, she will move on to the knockout round. The other LDS contestants have yet to compete in battles.

“Aaliyah you are unbelievable. That vibrato blows my mind,” Gwen Stefani says on The Voice.

Rose shares insights with LDS Living as to why she sings and how her experience has been with The Voice.

“My mom says I started singing as soon as I started to talk. I would sing on my coffee table with my fake microphones and sing for my family,” Rose says. “I have always dreamed about being on The Voice, but I was always too young. When I heard that they changed the age limit to 13 years old I was so excited to get to audition.”

A big part of Rose’s reason for singing is to motivate others through her music.

“I want to show young kids that they can do anything they put their mind to,” Rose says.

As Rose is close with her family and they have been a huge support to her in this endeavor, she also wants to make them proud.

Sometimes faith can be tested when placed in the position of a spotlight, but for Rose, she shows her strength when others around her may have different standards.

“Being a singer on the show you have options to wear lots of different styles of clothing. I love fashion and I love being able to show girls that you can dress modestly and still look and feel beautiful,” Rose says. “I actually wrote a song called 'Inside Out' for the 2014 EFY Mutual CD. This song is about how our beauty comes from the inside out and isn't determined by what we wear or the way we look. We are all beautiful and God made us each perfect in our own way!”

Rose says her favorite part about being on The Voice so far has been in getting to know so many other singers and she feels that these friendships will last forever. Rose has also seen personal development from the chance to be on the stage and among so many other talented artists.

“I have grown through this experience by learning to trust my feelings and be confident in who I am. I also can sometimes have a hard time expressing how I feel and this experience is helping me come out of my shell,” Rose says.

See Rose's blind audition below:

 

Lead photo by Trae Patton/NBC
Comments and feedback can be sent to feedback@ldsliving.com