Shame helps keep porn in the dark

To be fair, the room was crowded — by anyone's definition.

But after several minutes of observation, it became apparent the crowd itself had little to do with the unusual congestion in the middle of the hotel foyer that morning.

After rising early on a Saturday and paying twice the cost of a movie ticket to get in, grandparents, PTA moms and young couples had all entered the room with conviction. But somewhere between a glance at literature about child pornography and illustrations on hormonal changes after viewing nudity, much of their confidence shattered.

People gravitated toward the middle of the open reception area, distancing themselves from any specific information booth that lined the walls.

The keynote address wasn't to begin for another 30 minutes.

Many were noticeably nervous, always on the lookout: "Who'll I see? … Who'll see me?"

To be seen at an anti-pornography conference might be perceived as noble. But the thought of being seen — no, caught — by a neighbor standing at a specific booth inquiring about pornography filtering software, or information on sex addiction support groups, clearly distressed many of the 1,000-plus attendees at this year's Utah Coalition Against Pornography spring conference in downtown Salt Lake.

"Would appearing interested at a booth make me or my family look like users?"

Read the rest of this story at deseretnews.com
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