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Young Men Lesson 7: "A Mighty Change of Heart"

by | Feb. 03, 2012

Young Men

Discussion Questions
• What does it mean to have a mighty change of heart? (see Mosiah 3:19; 5:1–2).
• How does a mighty change of heart affect your actions or behavior?

Excerpt from "Preserving the Heart's Mighty Change" by Elder Dale G. Renlund, October 2009 General Conference:

In December 1967 the first successful heart transplant was performed in Cape Town, South Africa. The dying man’s diseased heart was removed, and a healthy heart from a deceased donor was sewn in its place. Since then, over 75,000 heart transplants have been performed worldwide.

In each heart transplant recipient, the patient’s own body recognizes the new, lifesaving heart as “foreign” and begins to attack it. Left unchecked, the body’s natural response will reject the new heart, and the recipient will die. Medicines can suppress this natural response, but the medications must be taken daily and with exactness. Furthermore, the condition of the new heart must be monitored. Occasional heart biopsies are performed wherein small pieces of heart tissue are removed and then examined under a microscope. When signs of rejection are found, medications are adjusted. If the rejection process is detected early enough, death can be averted.

Surprisingly, some patients become casual with their transplanted hearts. They skip their medicines here and there and obtain the needed follow-up less frequently than they should. They think that because they feel good, all is well. Too often this shortsighted attitude puts the patients at risk and shortens their lives.

A heart transplant can prolong life for years for people who would otherwise die from heart failure. But it is not “the ultimate operation,” as Time magazine called it in 1967. 1 The ultimate operation is not a physical but a spiritual “mighty change” of heart. 2

To read the full talk, click here.
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