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FHE: Fan the Flame of You Faith

Shauna Gibby - August 18, 2014

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Faith is one of the most important principles that we as members of the Church should strive to live by. Help fan the flame of your family's faith.

FHE: Fan the Flame of Your Faith

Conference Talk:

For more information on this topic read "You Know Enough," by Neil L. Andersen, Ensign, Nov 2008, 13-14.

Thought:

Faith is not only a feeling; it is a decision. [We] need to choose faith.

(Neil L. Andersen, "You Know Enough," Ensign, Nov 2008, 13-14.)

Song:

"Nephi's Courage," Children's Songbook, p. 120.

Scripture:

As soon as Jesus heard the word that was spoken, he saith unto the ruler of the synagogue, Be not afraid, only believe.

(Mark 5:36)

Lesson:

Ask the following three questions of your family.

What would happen if you sat in one of the chairs in the room? (It would hold you up.)

What would happen if you turned the light switch off? (The lights would go out.)

What would happen if you pressed a pencil against a paper and moved it around? (It would write.)

Now try all three of the "experiments." Afterward ask the family how they could know the results of the experiments before they happened. They were able to know because they have experienced these things over and over again. They have begun to trust the results. Share an example. The first time a baby turns a light switch off and on, it surprises him. But as he does it again and again it doesn't surprise him anymore. He has developed faith in that light switch.

Help family members understand that that is the way spiritual faith is developed also. Share another example. If you are sick, father gives you a priesthood blessing. You begin to recover quickly.

At first this surprises you. As you grow up you receive more blessings when you need them. Gradually the results don't surprise you anymore. You have developed faith in the priesthood power.

Heavenly Father desires to help us in our lives. He wants us to trust him with our needs. If we will go to him, he will answer our prayers each time. Gradually our faith will grow.

Discuss what things can we seek Heavenly Father's help with? Point out that all the ideas they came up with are opportunities to strengthen their faith.

(Beth Lefgren and Jennifer Jackson, Sharing Time, Family Time, Anytime, [Salt Lake City: Bookcraft, 1992], p. 16.)

Story:

Shortly after I was called as a General Authority, I went to Elder Harold B. Lee for counsel. He listened very carefully to my problem and suggested that I see President David O. McKay. President McKay counseled me as to the direction I should go. I was willing to be obedient but saw no possible way for me to do as he counseled me to do.

I returned to Elder Lee and told him that I saw no way to move in the direction I was counseled to go. He said, "The trouble with you is you want to see the end from the beginning." I replied that I would like to see at least a step or two ahead. Then came the lesson of a lifetime: "You must learn to walk to the edge of the light, and then a few steps into the darkness, then the light will appear and show the way before you." Then he quoted these eighteen words from the Book of Mormon: "Dispute not because you see not, for ye receive no witness until after after the trial of your faith" (Ether 12:6).

(Boyd K. Packer, Memorable Stories With a Message, [Salt Lake City, Deseret Book, 2000], p. 33.)

Activity:

Choose one person to be the "hunter" and one person to be the "deer." The hunter and the deer are both blindfolded. They stand at opposite ends of a long table. The hunter attempts to catch the deer, and the latter tries to avoid being caught as they both move around the table. The family should remain quiet so that the hunter can stalk the deer through any movements he makes. The game is exciting for the spectators as well as for the players. Sometimes, to add to the fun, the hunter is allowed to make an occasional noise by rapping on the table. This gives the deer more chance to get away. The variation is amusing, for often the hunter decides to rap just when, without knowing it, he has practically caught the deer.

(Alma Heaton, The LDS Game Book, [Salt Lake City: Bookcraft, 1968], p. 122.)

Refreshment

Spring Fruit Cups

  • 1 (15-ounce) can mandarin oranges, undrained
  • 1 cup strawberries, sliced
  • 1 cup grapes, red or green
  • 2 apples, chopped
  • 2 bananas, sliced
  • 1 cup orange juice
  • 1/4 cup sugar
Combine all ingredients in a large bowl. Place in small cups when ready to serve. Makes about 8 cups.

(Julie Badger Jensen, Essential Mormon Celebrations, [Salt Lake City: Deseret Book, 2005], p. 59.)

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