Close X

Young Men Lesson 25: Forgiveness

Manual 1; Excerpt from "School Thy Feelings, O My Brother" by Thomas S. Monson

June 15, 2012

Thinkstock.

"If we desire to have a proper spirit with us at all times, we must choose to refrain from becoming angry." -Thomas S. Monson

Discussion Questions:
  • Why is it particularly important for Aaronic Priesthood holders to forgive others? (see D&C 20:53–54).
  • What are the results of not forgiving others? (see D&C 64:8–9)

Excerpt from "School Thy Feelings, O My Brother" by Thomas S. Monson, October 2009 General Conference:

We’ve all felt anger. It can come when things don’t turn out the way we want. It might be a reaction to something which is said of us or to us. We may experience it when people don’t behave the way we want them to behave. Perhaps it comes when we have to wait for something longer than we expected. We might feel angry when others can’t see things from our perspective. There seem to be countless possible reasons for anger.

There are times when we can become upset at imagined hurts or perceived injustices. President Heber J. Grant, seventh President of the Church, told of a time as a young adult when he did some work for a man who then sent him a check for $500 with a letter apologizing for not being able to pay him more. Then President Grant did some work for another man—work which he said was 10 times more difficult, involving 10 times more labor and a great deal more time. This second man sent him a check for $150. Young Heber felt he had been treated most unfairly. He was at first insulted and then incensed.

He recounted the experience to an older friend, who asked, “Did that man intend to insult you?”

President Grant replied, “No. He told my friends he had rewarded me handsomely.”

To this the older friend replied, “A man’s a fool who takes an insult that isn’t intended.” 3

Read the full talk.

Leave a Comment
Login to leave a comment.