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Something to watch, read, hear, and do for this week’s “Come, Follow Me” on Mosiah 29–Alma 4

In this week’s Come, Follow Me, we explore Mosiah 29–Alma 4. As you dive into the lesson this week, here is something to watch, something to read, something to listen to, and something to do. We hope these prompts, in addition to the Come, Follow Me manual, will enhance your understanding of these chapters. 

Watch

A short Book of Mormon Video highlights Alma stepping down as chief judge.

The Come Follow Me—For Sunday School manual gives the following prompt that relates to the video:

"Many people can relate to what Alma felt when he was 'very sorrowful' (Alma 4:15) about the wickedness and afflictions of his people. Maybe class members could think about a loved one they are worried about and keep that person in mind as they read Alma 4:12–20. After class members read, you might ask questions like these to prompt discussion of the verses: What brought joy to the people in their difficult circumstances? What does the phrase 'the Spirit of the Lord did not fail him' mean to you? (Alma 4:15). What sacrifices did Alma make to help his people, and what sacrifices are we sometimes asked to make? What examples have we seen of the power of 'pure testimony'? (Alma 4:19). How can we share our testimonies without lecturing or being judgmental? You might give class members time to write a message of testimony to their loved ones."

Read

In an article for LDS LivingJohn Hilton III, author of The Founder of our Peace, shares that Alma the Younger teaches us about eliminating distractions and simplifying our lives as he steps down from his role as high priest, and that lesson is something that we can apply in our own lives:

"Giving up an important position was likely hard for Alma, and it will not be easy for us to determine which areas in our lives need pruning. Nevertheless, it is a vital skill to be able to decide, 'What will I not do?' All of us face different situations, and our surpluses of time and money vary widely. Although the specific applications will vary, as we thoughtfully and prayerfully consider what we will not purchase, not keep, and what activities we will not do, we will find greater peace."

Read the full article by John Hilton III here.

Hear

In this week’s episode of Sunday on Monday, the study group shares what we learn about how we can determine between what is true and what is popular from the story of Nehor and his false preaching. The study group also digs into what we can do to find truth and peace as we continue the search for answers to our questions. The group shares a quote from Elder L. Tom Perry about Nehor’s teachings:

“Nehor’s words appealed to the people, but his doctrine, while popular to many, was incorrect. As we face the many decisions in life, the easy and popular messages of the world will not usually be the right ones to choose, and it will take much courage to choose the right.”

The Sunday on Monday Study Group is a Deseret Bookshelf PLUS+ original presented by LDS Living. You can access the full study group discussion through the Bookshelf app. Listen to a segment of this week's episode below or listen to the full Sunday on Monday episode here.

Do

Emily Belle Freeman and David Butler, hosts of the “Don’t Miss This” YouTube channel, are hosting the “Summer of Heroes” from June–August as we study the book of Alma. Each week, the duo will highlight a different hero found in the book of Alma, provide a protection scripture that encompasses one of the qualities of the hero, and issue a challenge to prepare to be battle-ready.

For example, this week’s hero is Gideon, who was “a righteous man, yea, a man who has done much good among this people” (Alma 1:13) and the battle-ready challenge is to “Do much good.”

Details on how to participate are found in the “Don’t Miss This” newsletter. You’ll also want to pick up a Don’t Miss This 2020 Journal so you can follow along with their weekly videos. This week’s lesson is included below.

Lead image: YouTube screenshot


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Lindsey Williams

Lindsey Williams joined the LDS Living team with a passion to find the stories that matter most. Previous stops in her career include BYU-Pathway Worldwide, the Special Projects Department of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and Utah Valley Magazine. When she's not searching for stories to write, the Colorado Springs native is most likely on a hiking trail. 

Comments and feedback can be sent to feedback@ldsliving.com