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Take a Photo Walk Through Temple Square Changes from 1855 to Today

As announced earlier this year, beginning on December 29, 2019, the Salt Lake Temple will be closed for renovations for the next four years. Portions of Temple Square will also be undergoing significant changes. As the heart of Salt Lake City, Temple Square has been transformed many times since it's mid-1800's creation, with the adding and removing of numerous buildings, structures, and features. Below are photographs documenting Temple Square's history, showing both the area's past, present, and future.

1800s

Photo from the Utah State Historical Society

The first Salt Lake Tabernacle, built on the corner of Temple Square where the Assembly Hall now sits (1855).

Photo from the Utah State Historical Society

The Endowment House, dedicated on the Temple Square block for temple ordinances until the Salt Lake Temple was finished. It was built in 1855 and torn down in 1889. Pictured here are stones for the temple in front of the Endowment House.

Photo from the Utah State Historical Society

Overlooking current-day Temple Square from the north. Notice that the Salt Lake Tabernacle we are familiar with today is under construction (1866).

Photo from the Utah State Historical Society

Temple Square, looking north. The temple foundation can be seen (1867).

Photo from the Utah State Historical Society

Looking east at the Salt Lake Temple construction (1877).

Photo from the Utah State Historical Society

The inside of the newly constructed Assembly Hall. Notice the paintings on the ceiling that are no longer there today (1880).

Photo from the Utah State Historical Society

Temple Square before the Salt Lake Temple was completed (1889).

Photo from the Utah State Historical Society

E. G. Holding (right) and George Albert Smith (left) inspecting a new electric light on top of the Salt Lake Temple (1892).

Photo from the Utah State Historical Society

Looking down over one of the Salt Lake Temple's southeast spires to Temple Square and the Assembly Hall. Notice that the Seagull Monument and the pioneer handcart statue seen near the Assembly Hall today have not been placed yet. Also notice the tall trees lining South Temple street outside of the Temple Square wall, which are no longer there today (1892).

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