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Raising Pornography-Immune Kids: 7 Strategies for Parents


3. Know your enemy.

Sun Tsu, an ancient Chinese general known for his military genius, taught the importance of knowing your enemy if you want to be victorious in battle. In order for parents to be effective in pornography-proofing their kids, they need to understand the enemies their kids are up against. For example, many LDS parents might think of pornography as the nude centerfold of a men’s magazine or maybe even videos of a man and woman engaging in sex. Sadly, today’s porn has metastasized into 32,000 deviant and violent forms, all easily accessible from any mobile device for free.

Furthermore, hundreds of apps like Hide It Pro allow for hiding videos and pictures on a phone behind something as normal looking as a calculator. And many teens consider sending nude photos of themselves via Snapchat as an acceptable form of flirting. This is the world our kids are growing up in—so parents, know your enemy!

Organizations like Fight the New Drug, the National Center on Sexual Exploitation, and Protect Young Minds are helpful resources to keep parents up to date. It takes minutes per week to stay informed, but the benefits can continue for a lifetime and bless generations.

4. Set an example.

We all know that kids learn best when parents back up their teaching with example. Let your kids see you turning away from pornographic images or commercials. Help kids label sexualized images by saying, “That’s pornography!”

For parents who struggle with pornography, therapist Jeffrey J. Ford advises that “the best gift [parents who are addicted] can give their kids is to start working on their own recovery whether it’s through professional counseling, a…Church leader, or a 12-step program.”

Moreover, Ford encourages parents to tell their kids (who may already secretly know) about their struggles.

“Kids often feel there’s something wrong. [Parents] don’t need to share the details of their addiction or recovery efforts, but it’s a big relief for kids to know that their [parent] is being proactive and getting help.”

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