Close X

The Skinny on Diet Sodas + Poll

Dr. Thomas J. Boud, MD - March 22, 2011

Thinkstock.

*Take our poll on diet soda (scroll to bottom).*

Patients often ask me how they can lose weight. As we discuss the balance between their caloric expenditure versus their caloric intake, the subject of beverages inevitably arises.

For now, let’s skip the whole caffeine subject. I won’t even focus on the regular calorie soft drinks sweetened with high fructose corn syrup. (That one’s really a no-brainer.)
Let’s just consider the commonly misunderstood topic of diet sodas.

I was taught in medical school not to “drink” your calories. High-calorie drinks are too quickly absorbed, don’t have enough fiber, raise blood sugar, spike insulin, and then cause reactive hypoglycemia. How, then, does the low calorie or no calorie artificially sweetened drink fit into all this? It’s confusing.

Here in the United States the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the use of six different artificial sweeteners: stevia, aspartame, sucralose, neotame, acesulfame potassium, and saccharin. Each one is many times sweeter than sugar and can be used in small doses to sweeten products, making their caloric contribution negligible. Each is used in various foods based on the chemical’s innate characteristics, such as stability to heat, aftertaste, texture, etc.

These products have been the source of intensive controversy regarding their potential health risks. Artificial sweeteners have been blamed for causing everything from impotency to cancer. Hundreds of toxicological, clinical, and post marketing studies have been performed and reviewed in detail trying to establish a link to any of these adverse side effects. Here’s what the literature shows: when used in accordance with established FDA guidelines, these products are considered safe for consumption as long as the volume is kept within the recommended acceptable daily intake (ADI). Each ADI varies based on which artificial sweetener is used. There are over 100 regulatory agencies from numerous countries around the world that concur with the safety of these additives.

Diet sodas are okay then, right? Not quite. Now, I know what you’re thinking, “Dr. Boud—don’t mess with this one. It’s the one vice I’m allowed.”

I agree that there are worse things to get hooked on. But the reality is that several studies show that drinking diet sodas doesn’t really help with weight loss. There are several theories on why this occurs. One is based on the brain’s response to the sweetness in diet sodas, which triggers a craving of more calories and more sugar. This perpetuates itself, and you keep on eating and drinking until your intake of calories exceeds your expenditure of calories.

It becomes very easy to lose track of the amount you drink during the day. Do you really have any idea how much volume you are putting down the hatch? Recently a patient told me it’s cheaper for her to fill up a 64-ounce jug of soda every morning at the gas station than to buy a smaller 12-ounce can—and she gets to just sip it throughout the work day. Besides it keeps her awake.

I’ll let you guess what health problem she was in to talk to me about.

Despite not having many calories, diet sodas still have a known association with increased weight, diabetes, hypertension, and, most recently, stroke risk. One theory for this is the body’s reactive release of the hormone insulin when it recognizes the sweet taste in artificially sweetened products. Insulin is a storage hormone and will put circulating glucose into storage (a.k.a. fat cells) causing a paradoxical drop in blood sugar. This then can stimulate appetite, promote further carbohydrate cravings, and cause you to seek out high calorie snacks for quick energy. Either way, diet or non-diet, you end up having an insulin surge with a resulting hypoglycemic crash, leaving you feeling tired and grumpy, with increased difficulty concentrating. The only way to avoid this roller coaster ride is to constantly keep your blood sugar up—which just leads to more empty calories, higher circulating insulin levels, and presto—you’re a typical overweight American.

So what do we do? I like the principle of moderation. It’s good for us to cut back on our regular full-calorie beverages. It’s even better to limit our consumption of diet sodas. I believe it’s best to focus on good old H2O. Let that be our drink of choice.

Now let’s get healthy!

—Dr Boud

Thomas J. Boud, MD, is board certified in family medicine and practices in Salt Lake Valley. He is also a volunteer physician for the Church’s Missionary Medical Department and cares for the health care of many of the local fulltime missionaries. He is an avid runner, having completed more than 50 full marathons. He is married to a very patient wife and has six beautiful children, two of which are currently serving full-time missions.

How often do you drink diet soda?








Do you think diet soda is healthier than regular soda?





If you had the choice, which would you drink?







© LDS Living 2011.
Comments 35 comments

howsharbell said...

09:20 AM
on Mar 22, 2011

Report Abuse

Great article! I just have to correct one point though... stevia is not an artificial sweetener. In it's true form it is simply an herb that is very sweet (and wonderful to use in many ways). Now recently there has been a trend to chemically alter stevia to a form of stevia that can be patented (because you can't patent a natural herb) and that can certainly be lumped into the artificial sweetener category and should be used with caution.

abarbieri said...

10:09 AM
on Mar 22, 2011

Report Abuse

You have got to be kidding me. Diet sodas are now a “vice”? And we know this because some family practitioner read an article and is now a renowned global expert on the subject? I am on the Board of a large bio-med company in CA. I have actually read extensively on this subject. Mostly to disprove all of the nonsensical email forwards I get from members I know that claim some friend of a brother-in-law’s third cousin contracted HIV from drinking diet coke while sitting on an uncovered toilet seat. There has never in history been more scientific research directed at studying the heath affects of any single item more than artificial sweeteners. There has never been found any material adverse side effects from the use of these products. Artificial sweeteners are actually one of God’s greatest blessings to Mormons, who are generally more overweight than the population as a whole. Finally, to make the assertion that Mormons over eat because artificial sweeteners “trick their brains into over eating other sweets” is also an insult. If you are over eating, then stop blaming everything around you, and do something about it. If any of the readers here really want to learn about this subject, go to some research of your own. You can start at FDA.gov

laniej said...

10:52 AM
on Mar 22, 2011

Report Abuse

Thanks for explaining this in a way that many people can hopefully understand - the insulin production connection with sweet tastes, not just physical sugar. There is also medical proof that shows that carbonation also contributes to weight gain, but that's another article I suppose. It's too bad that the comment(s) by abarbieri can't see the article for what it is, and also needed to take shots at the author, an MD. Abarbieri, you said it yourself - Mormons are generally more overweight..., and they drink lots of diet soda - and you can't see the connection? Hmmmm. Why then HAVE their been billions of dollars poured into thousands of studies on this, and continue to be? It's because there is still concern, and no positive proof yet of the safety of it all. And my favorite part of abarieri's post: go to FDA.gov! Ya, 'cause the government is so forthcoming on everything!

mgdj said...

11:12 AM
on Mar 22, 2011

Report Abuse

for abarbieri: several studies have concluded that artificial sweeteners may indeed lead to weight gain: http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/OnCall/story?id=4271246&page=1 http://www.webmd.com/diet/news/20040630/artificial-sweeteners-damage-diet-efforts there are many more, including on the Mayo Clinic website; just google "artificial sweeteners, weight gain"

das said...

11:55 AM
on Mar 22, 2011

Report Abuse

for abarieri: YOU'VE got to be kidding. You are on a board and you read . . . hurrah. You have a closed interest in a company that deals in chemicals and drugs so of course you're going to spout off a bunch of false claims about chemical safety vs natural food safety. You have the dumbfounded nerve to claim that every single article of which there are hundreds are fabricated lies about the chemicals your company produces and that they are safe when there are hundreds of articles to the contrary done independently for no monetary gain that prove otherwise. FDA.gov?? That's like saying, 'Trust me, I'm from the government and I'm here to help". Bah!

capri said...

12:08 PM
on Mar 22, 2011

Report Abuse

I often wonder which poll it was that determined that Mormons are "generally" more over weight than the population as a whole. That's sure a whole lot of Mormons to poll, or to weigh, or to measure, etc.... I know I wasn't invited to participate in this poll, nor has any one I know. I have traveled all over the globe, living in a whole lot of wards and stake across the nation and world. I honestly haven't seen much difference in the measurements/weights of people from one religion to another. It's pretty well mixed. Could this be a "generalization"? Just "food" for thought.

supersparky said...

12:32 PM
on Mar 22, 2011

Report Abuse

I've found my body has built up a resistance to eating artificial sweeteners on its own. I didn't read any articles, nor had I heard about any negative effects of artificial sweeteners at the time. I am on a guided Doctor supervised weight loss program and was told a certain yogurt and diet sodas were ok for me. So that's what I ate for a while. After about a month and a half eating this stuff, my body suddenly had a distaste for this yogurt and sodas. Just to make sure it just wasn't the fact I was just eating a lot of the same thing, I tried other things with artificial sweeteners (typically aspartame). All were hard to just put in my mouth, because as soon as it hit my tongue, I'd get nauseous. I told my Doctor and he theorized my body has had enough of artificial sweeteners and turned it into a revulsion. So alternate, more natural foods were suggested. Just something to think about.

andy said...

12:37 PM
on Mar 22, 2011

Report Abuse

I am sort of curious about the statement that Mormons are heavier as group than any other group. I have lieved in a half dozen wards and stakes in my life time and find to my sadness that we seem to have the sqame percentage of overweight people as the general population to my sadness. I serve in the temple and find that about a quarter of the workers on my shift are diabetic. some more sadness. SO SO we have the truth and the word of wisdom and if we choose to ignore it so be it ANDY

mjduley said...

01:00 PM
on Mar 22, 2011

Report Abuse

abarbieri: "If any of the readers here really want to learn about this subject, go to some research of your own." I have done quite a bit of research on this subject and my findings concur with this article. This information isn't new. I've actually been hearing about it for a couple of years now. Seems as if your post is full of a lot of inaccurate generalizations.

betty said...

10:43 PM
on Mar 22, 2011

Report Abuse

there is not much left for a diabetic to drink but water......suggestions please

howsharbell said...

11:13 PM
on Mar 22, 2011

Report Abuse

Betty: You can buy many flavors of liquid stevia. My kids love drinking their water with these different flavors in it, we also mix it into plain greek yogurt instead of eating the sugar laden type. I cook, and bake with it too. Do some reading on stevia and do a google search for flavored liquid stevia, it's fabulous!

bstaley said...

06:04 AM
on Mar 23, 2011

Report Abuse

my husband was a huge diet coke, diet pepsi, & diet dr pepper fan and consumed large amounts daily. he was overweight, and became a diabetic in his later years which goes along with what Dr. Boud is saying in this article. he died in 2009 of throat cancer -he had a rare, aggressive cancer that took his life within 6 mos of diagnosis. in the back of my mind I keep thinking there is a connection. So for me personally I stay away from diet drinks.

abarbieri said...

11:31 AM
on Mar 23, 2011

Report Abuse

I’ve much appreciate the few articulate rebuttals I’ve received to my earlier post. For those respondents, who state my comments are not based on facts, let’s try these. OBESITY: The rate of obesity in America has tripled in the past 25 years. In fact, according to the Center for Disease Control (CDC) the percent of Utah residents who are obese (having a Body Mass Index greater than 30) has increased from 8% of the population in 1985 to 23.5% in 2009. Similar trends is true for all Americans. (1) DIABETES: Also, according to the CDC, the incidence of diabetes in America has increased over 600% since 1960 rising from under 1% in 1960 to almost 7% in 2009. (2) The American Diabetes Association’s website actually encourages Americans to … “curb your cravings for something sweet with food and drinks that use artificial sweeteners”. Diabetes is projected to become the number two cause of death in the U.S. by 2040. OBESITY IN MORMONS: A BYU professor found that adult Mormons in Utah are 34% more likely to be obese than non-Mormons. (3) Would a person be healthier if he/she followed the word of wisdom and only ate vegetables and grains? … sure. However that’s obviously not the world most of us live in. Many health conscious members are trying to reverse these alarming health trends by reducing high calorie sugars in their diets by using artificially sweetened drinks and foods. To write and publish articles that suggest they are harming themselves, or committing “vices” is not only baseless, it’s really just irresponsible. Now for the rest of your comments: Fact is not the Plural of antidote. A few antidotal studies and stories do not offset over a thousand clinical research studies conducted at hundreds of universities and labs around the world… all of which find these product to be safe, and effective in reducing weight and blood sugars. For example, my mother who died at an early age of congenital heart failure absolutely loved tomatoes and ate them every day. While some might choose to see cause and effect here, I choose to eat tomatoes. (1) http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/data/trends.html (2) http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/data/trends.html (3) http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/11355738/ns/health-fitness/

62sissy said...

03:52 PM
on Mar 24, 2011

Report Abuse

In the past two years I've suffered diabetes, epilepsy,kidney failure, and breast cancer. I was served diet drinks in the hospital. Will I give them up? Heavens no! Might drink less, but certainly not go dry turkey!

logan said...

12:37 AM
on Mar 25, 2011

Report Abuse

To abarbieri, I hope you won't mind a gentle correction. The word is "anecdotal", not "antidotal". As to soda, I have a low bone density, so I drink soda (diet) extremely rarely. I wish to hold on to all the bone I can.

softdev2k said...

07:58 PM
on Mar 26, 2011

Report Abuse

I don't know for studies, but over a year ago I lost 85 lbs by eating (and drinking) low-glycemic foods and drinks - including diet sodas. (Low glycemic = balanced foods where sugars and proteins are about 1:1 ratio.) And I've kept the weight off now for over a year doing the same. I know that a direct result of my weight loss is greatly improve health and well-being, greater desire and ability to exercise more and a much reduced risk of many diseases and catastrophic illnesses as - Type 2 diabetes probably being the worst. Think about it: How many people do you know that are over 60, overweight, and have a problem with diabetes and/or high blood sugars? For me the proof is in the pudding - and I'll keep on drinking diet sodas when given the choice.

softdev2k said...

08:01 PM
on Mar 26, 2011

Report Abuse

Oh.. and so you'll know. I haven't experience any of the "theories" put forth in this article where my craving for sweets was enhanced by drinking diet sodas. I really don't crave sweets. In fact, most of the sweet stuff I see or try any more doesn't even taste good.... just saying...

jkrmac said...

09:37 PM
on Mar 26, 2011

Report Abuse

Ok, to be frank I think that everyone needs to calm down. As to the effects of diet vs not doesn't really matter. Stop judging each other and whether or not we need a "vice" or are breaking the word of wisdom. The true reality of it is that if you are that bent on being healthy just drink water.

jkrmac said...

09:37 PM
on Mar 26, 2011

Report Abuse

Ok, to be frank I think that everyone needs to calm down. As to the effects of diet vs not doesn't really matter. Stop judging each other and whether or not we need a "vice" or are breaking the word of wisdom. The true reality of it is that if you are that bent on being healthy just drink water.

dietsodadrinker said...

09:43 AM
on Mar 27, 2011

Report Abuse

I think I may be a case study. I've been drinking a 2 liter a day(at least)for the last 15 years of my life.. I'm not overweight but I am extremely active. I do take meds for ADHD and depression. I struggled with an eating disorder in my twenties that I'm sure had everything to do with trying to maintain an unhealthy weight for my body, and perhaps the pseudo-sugar thing played into it some. I do struggle with highs/lows in energy throughout the day, more-so than others it seems. I've wondered how all this is affecting my body and whether or not I'll regret it in the future. I haven't heard of anyone dying with anything caused specifically by diet soft drinks be it caffeine, sugar substitutes or carbonation, at least not in the mainstream/local news. I also haven't done any deep extensive research on the effects of these things. Personally I don't like to be dependent on anything, I periodically try living without meds but then realize I really can't (not with this lifestyle). At least once a year I've tried quiting the soda and after the initial day or two (nothing aspirin can't cure) I'm fine but I definitely don't have the high energy, tackle big projects in a day capability that I usually have. But as soon as I add that diet soda/caffeine/sugar substitute/carbonation back into the mix that old feelling comes back and things get accomplished. I'm 40 yrs. old, farmers/ranchers wife, two kids, don't smoke, don't drink alcohol or coffee... diet soda and swearing at cows are my two worst vices, hopefully it will be a few years but I'll let someone know if my diet soda drinking has shortened my life.. or perhaps diet soda just makes life go faster.

lorilou said...

02:36 PM
on Mar 28, 2011

Report Abuse

I remember those days when soda was such a treat and I thought that diet soda was such a bonus treat because it seemed to somehow cheat away the calories. It's funny. Now I don't want either, except for on rare occasions when I can enjoy no more than half a can. I actually don't want it anymore. Our bodies know what make us feel good and energized. When we pay better attention to how we feel, instead of how we look, amazing things happen. This concept (tied to a few others) changed my life. I was recently compelled to write my story down for those who may identify with my frustrations with this food "game" and how it is no longer a part of my life. In case you're interested, my book is called STOP THINKING ABOUT IT! Winning the Emotional Battle Surrounding Food and Weight Loss. -- stopthinkingaboutit.com. Hope this is helpful to someone!

catherineheiby said...

03:22 PM
on Mar 28, 2011

Report Abuse

1)most folks in my ward are average in weight or slim and even fit (in my opinion)---so my ward isn't quite the norm, as described here. 2)adding a small amount of juice to water not only saves on sugar and calories consumed but also adds a surprising boost to the taste and makes it possible to drink more fluids too. my personal favorites are cranberry juice (100%), lemon juice and lime juice. 3)FYI-not everyone who is overweight overeats (it is ill-advised to assume you know) AND not everyone's body responds to exercise the same way (again it is ill-advised to assume you know). 4)i am a firm believer in eating and drinking diversely and moderately. anytime a person eats all of one thing or drinks all of one thing certainly it would seem that problems will arise from this habit---i.e. allergies, disorders, deficiencies, etc.

frogguy said...

04:08 PM
on Mar 28, 2011

Report Abuse

abarbieri is right on. First, if one can use some simple reasoning and logic, this article would seem to fall flat on its face. The good doctor states, "One theory for this is the body’s reactive release of the hormone insulin when it recognizes the sweet taste in artificially sweetened products. Insulin is a storage hormone and will put circulating glucose into storage (a.k.a. fat cells) causing a paradoxical drop in blood sugar." If that were even remotely true, then diabetics could lower their blood glucose levels simply by swigging diet sodas which is so far from true that it's laughable. Nevertheless, the good doctor and many others repeat that statement. None of them ever actually name the specific "studies" that have shown it to be the case or give links to them. One "well informed" soul, when he learned that I was diabetic, asked me if I drank diet drinks containing aspartame. When I responded that I did, he said, well, that's what caused your diabetes. When I told him I NEVER drank diet soda until two years after I became diabetic, he changed the subject. When we then read the "about" info at the end of article, we learn that "Thomas J. Boud, MD, is board certified in family medicine..." He's a general practitioner? He's a family doctor? And he's writing an article that tends to indicate that he's an expert in scientific chemical studies? That is bad journalism. So I should write a shocking article on the chemical components in woods that are used in pianos because I sold them for years? Does that make me an expert in piano chemical analysis? The well known fact that drinking aspartame laced diet soda does not decrease the blood glucose levels in diabetics is enough evidence to prove that comment in this article is pure bunk, regardless of what any unspecified studies may have indicated it. By the way, there is empirical evidence that wearing pantyhose causes cancer. In a poorly funded study that I myself conducted, it was learned that 98.375% of women who contracted any variety of cancer had, at one point in their life, worn pantyhose. The evidence is in. Pantyhose cause cancer.

ljraveney said...

02:53 PM
on Mar 29, 2011

Report Abuse

@frogguy: While you do make some valid points (which I appreciate), the fact that diabetics cannot lower their blood sugar levels by consuming diet sodas is not actually a valid argument. In type 1 diabetes, the body no longer produces insulin, so any effect on insulin production is null. In type 2 diabetes, the body is resistant to insulin, and is already producing massive quantities of insulin to combat the higher blood sugar levels. Stimulating more insulin production would have negligible effects (if any) on the blood sugar. I think the message of moderation and self control is timely- whether in reference to diet soda or deep-fried twinkies.

gary2635 said...

07:12 PM
on Mar 29, 2011

Report Abuse

One important health issue is being ignored here. As a dentist for 35 years and dental school faculty member for 25 years I can tell you that any carbonated drink in large amounts, regardless of the sweetener, is harmful to your teeth. The acid in the carbonated drink decalcifies and weakens the enamel. Over time this can leave the teeth more susceptible to a number of dental diseases, especially increased sensitivity to cold.

marutter said...

11:28 AM
on Mar 31, 2011

Report Abuse

My own experience after drinking diet soda for years, I developed Fibromyalgia, Lupus, and Arthritis! I read reports that have proven this and now I suffer! Don't drink or eat anything that has Aspartame in it for this is the culprit!

marutter said...

11:35 AM
on Mar 31, 2011

Report Abuse

Artificial sweeteners also cause diarhea!

donnabee said...

12:40 PM
on Mar 31, 2011

Report Abuse

I agree with gary2635....Dentists will tell you carbonated drinks are very harmful to your teeth. Your kidneys, among other things, are also damaged. I've heard Urologists say they would be out of business if people stopped drinking soda. It wasn't difficult at all to stop drinking sodas once I made up my mind to do so and I feel so much better. Now water, especially iced, tastes SO GOOD! I've read where ice water is not good to drink with a meal. The blood works on warming up the water instead of digesting your food. So I drink tap water with a meal. Sometimes I put a little lemon in to enhance the taste. Now, carbonated drinks feel like gasoline going down my throat! Listen to your body; it will tell you what it likes and what is good for it.

lange said...

12:03 PM
on Apr 01, 2011

Report Abuse

i would like to see "peer reviewed" data discussing the harmful effects of diet sodas. I doubt that it is very strong. Overweight people are more likely to drink diet sodas, thus there will be a correlation.

musicstepkid said...

09:08 PM
on Apr 26, 2011

Report Abuse

I've been reading the comments on this article. I have been diabetic type I for 35 years. It's not easy to turn down desserts at parties and on holidays, so I learned to include them in small amounts as I do with all food I eat--small servings. Smaller portions will help anyone lose weight without sacrificing much of the food you enjoy. As members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, we tell the world how well we keep the word of wisdom by our appearance--over or under weight. Yes, I drink diet sodas sometimes frequently, sometimes infrequently. Dr. Boud suggests good information on all sodas. I would like to see more documented study information on his claims, however. My doctor tells me that glucose is what raises the blood sugar, not aspartame or stevia, or a stimulated brain. sugar is addictive for some people. We all have our addictions to overcome. I find if I eat lots of veggies, fruits, protein, I crave less high carbohydrate foods. By so doing, I find I can splurge once in a while and not gain weight or feel guilty. I grew up when ice cream and cake were a once-in-a-while treat, as was soda pop. We only bought it for summer picnics. We need to use more discernment and control when we go to the grocery store or to a restaurant.

daviddonnajones said...

01:58 AM
on May 15, 2011

Report Abuse

whoooo....to marutter I have to say, I have had fibromyalgia for 36 years...I don't consume diet drinks and never have. They haven't been the cause of 36 years of pain. etc. for me.

german_lds_member said...

12:24 PM
on Aug 23, 2011

Report Abuse

I'm really surprised reading an article from an MD suggesting that the sweet taste of artificial sweeteners would raise your insulin level. Doctor, let me clearly state this: It's nonsense. And you, of all people, should know this. Insulin is only triggered by an increased blood sugar level, not by your taste buds. Sorry, but I cannot take this article serious anymore after reading such a jokingly false statement from an MD.

jkcook said...

07:59 AM
on Sep 22, 2011

Report Abuse

I drink a ton of diet soda a day and have lost 30 pounds in the last year because I finally choose to eat correctly and exercise. SUGAR raises insulin, not other chemicals. Being fat is caused by personal choices, not by the chemicals in your drinks. If carbonation caused problems, the entire country of Germany would be dead because the Germans mainly drink carbonated water--they refuse to drink tap water. They still have healthy teeth and kidneys because they make other healthy choices. Wish they'd choose healthier on smoking. Stop blaming diet soda for overeating. People overeat because they want to, not because they drink diet soda.

momom said...

01:24 AM
on Feb 14, 2012

Report Abuse

I'm not sure why so many lds women think that it is "cute" to brag about being addicted to anything, even if it is soda pop. It is still so disturbing and sets such a terrible example to all the young women in our church. The newly revised For Strength of Youth pamphlet actually talked about staying away from drinks that give you a high. No, it doesn't specifically say soda, but really, does the Lord need to outline everything single thing for people to be obedient? Grow up and be women!

mistletoelady said...

02:50 PM
on Jun 15, 2012

Report Abuse

Great article! One thing mentioned is that stevia is an artificial sweetener. Not necessarily! If you are buying "Truvia" which is said to be "Stevia", you are right. However, if you are purchasing the dried green leaf of the Stevia plant, that is true stevia, and not an artificial sweetener. I grew up on soft drinks and coolaid. My mother refused to drink or let us drink plain water. "Oh WHO wants to drink something that has no taste!" She always argued. Now, out of the 7 of us, two have died at fairly young ages, one at 51 another at 59. Two have narclopsia (? Falling asleep without notice), one has mental issues, one has fibromalgia, two of us have hypoglycemia, which can turn to diabetes, and another has cancer! I'll bet, had we been allowed to drink that wonderfully tasting, refreshing, artesian well water, we would not have those issues today!
Leave a Comment
Login to leave a comment.