33857

3 Prayers That Will Get You Out of a Prayer Rut & Draw You Closer to Heavenly Father

Do you sometimes feel like your prayers are stuck in a rut?

Do you sometimes feel like your prayers are stuck in a rut? LDS author Joni Hilton provides three different ways of examining prayer that can help us break the routine of "good" prayers and draw closer to our Heavenly Father with the "best" prayers we can give.

How many parents out there would drop over in a dead faint if their grown children called, just to thank them for their love and generosity all these years? Okay, sorry—there are too many hands to count.

I’m joking—and I know some of you, in some rare, microscopic percentage, have actually experienced this. But imagine it. Wouldn’t you be thrilled? And don’t you cherish those childhood moments when your little one squeezes you around the neck and pronounces you the best mommy or daddy ever? Everyone loves to be appreciated.

Now think about Heavenly Father. How many phone calls does He get, just thanking Him? We don’t need a formal study; we can guess it’s a very small percentage of the prayers He hears. But wouldn’t it be the grandest, most awesome prayer you’ve prayed in awhile? Just showing our gratitude would be one of those banner days for both of us.

I loved that October 2007 conference talk by Elder Dallin H. Oaks, wherein he outlined the activities we pursue in life, and urged us to measure our choices by what is “good, better, and best.” But what if we applied that same formula to our prayers?


Image title

If you struggle between desiring a meaningful prayer relationship with deity and actually having one, this book is for you. It is both a how-to manual for beginners and an advanced course in penetrating the veil for those who hunger for God's presence. You'll discover you can set aside insincere trite phrases as you learn about prayer's true purpose and the phenomenal power it can have. Find out how to speak to Heavenly Father from your own heart, and how to listen for the answers He sends.

Read the rest of this story at ldsmag.com
Comments and feedback can be sent to feedback@ldsliving.com