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Huff Post: When I Became a Mother, Feminism Let Me Down

This is just one of many perspectives, but I think, whether you identify as a feminist or not, we can all agree, "We need to teach young people the skills they need to succeed -- not only in the workforce, but in the home as well. . . . Teaching women to care for children and a home empowers them. It prepares them for a path that may lie ahead. What really takes away their power, is telling them that doing so is worthless."

I am a feminist. I believe women should have equal opportunities to men. I acknowledge that they often do not. (Yes, even now.)

I am also a mother, and when it came to preparing for motherhood, feminism let me down.

From the beginning, we tell young girls they can do anything they want to do, they can be anyone they want to be. They are given access to great education, encouraged to further their studies and attain higher degrees. We push them to push themselves, to break boundaries, to achieve what seems impossible, to break through corporate glass ceilings and professional roadblocks.

We tell them they can have it all. And they can.

Until they have a baby.

In the fight to ensure equality, as we preach to girls that they can -- and should -- do anything a boy can do, we are failing to prepare women for one of the greatest challenges so many of them will face; motherhood. We are teaching our young people that there is no value in motherhood and that homemaking is an outdated, misogynistic concept.

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