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What Our 2 New Apostles Have Said Since Last General Conference

April 2018 general conference was historic as Elder Ulisses S. Soares and Elder Gerrit W. Gong were called and sustained as the newest members of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles. The two men bore powerful testimonies over the pulpit in the Sunday afternoon session and have since shared many valuable messages on their social media pages. 

Here are the messages they’ve shared since last general conference:  

Elder Ulisses Soares 

Elder Ulisses Soares was one of two men called to the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles during the last conference. After the Sunday sessions, he bore his testimony on Facebook saying, “I testify that He is the Savior and Redeemer of the world and that through Him we can be saved and exalted in the presence of God. I love Him. I adore Him. I want to follow Him, do His will, and become more like Him.” 

In May, he shared a photo of a mosaic of Christ that hangs in his office with a powerful message. “As I look at this beautiful mosaic and contemplate the peaceful countenance of the Savior, I remember that He is a constant in our lives. I know that He is always there for you, as He has been there for me.” 

Elder Soares shared an experience he and his wife had while visiting Africa. There was a little girl running around the chapel during one of their meetings, and Elder Soares watched as his wife got her attention, picked her up, and entertained her. He reflected on this experience and praised his wife for her example of a Christlike life. He then wrote, “Women all over the world have the same kind of influence every day. I want to say that I am thankful for every one of you. . . . The Lord loves you deeply and knows about every kind act you render.”

He also released a video speaking of his experience in the church as a child and emphasizes the importance of loving and having empathy for every person. 

In July, Elder Soares posted a message about ministering. “Ministering means to have a willing soul, to serve without the need of being set apart. It is the gospel in action. It is to love in the Lord’s way.”

Earlier this month, he posted about his trip back to Brazil with his wife and President M. Russell Ballard. He wrote, “I testify to you that He listens to our prayers in every moment of our lives, no matter the circumstances. We can trust in His love and His willingness to bless us.” 


Here are the Twitter messages he shared over the past six months: 


Elder Gerrit W. Gong

Elder Gerrit W. Gong was also called to the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles during the last conference. After it was over, he posted a powerful testimony of Christ, saying, “I reverently witness and solemnly testify of the living Christ—He who died, was buried, and rose again the third day, and ascended into heaven. He is Alpha and Omega—with us in the beginning, He is with us to the end.” 

In May, he shared a message about how perfectionism can cause “despair and doubt.” He wrote, “through the Atonement of Jesus Christ, we find faith, strength, and trust to come unto Christ, knowing perfection is in Him.” 

He then wrote to young people in July concerning how to accomplish all the tasks required of us. Elder Gong and his wife served in busy callings as students, and he reflected on that time saying, “It was during that early period that we really came to know that if we did our very best, the Lord would bless us in every needful way.” 

 





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You young people may often face the question of how to do all the things in your busy lives that you feel like you need to. When my wife and I were young students, I was in the bishopric and Susan was serving in two or three callings. We were trying to manage quite a few different things. However, it was during that early period that we really came to know that if we did our very best, the Lord would bless us in every needful way. It’s been a foundation for us to know that as busy as things are, and as many things as we may be asked to do, the Lord will help us if we do our very best. I testify that the same will be true for you.

A post shared by  Gerrit W. Gong (@gerritwgong) on

Later that month, Elder Gong shared his thoughts on the temple mirrors that reflect on each other into eternity. He mentioned how he sees “a succession of family relationships in both directions.” He continues, “Mortality’s great lessons distill upon us as we learn and teach in eternal roles, including child and parent, parent and child.” 

In August, he wrote about the four things that matter most when dealing with trauma. These include “thank you,” “I love you,” “please forgive me,” and “I forgive you.” All of these phrases reflect attributes of the Atonement, and he gently reminds us that we don’t have to wait for traumatic experiences to experience them. “The Savior’s Atonement can infuse our role relationships, experiences, and knowledge right now.” 

https://www.instagram.com/p/Bm3yP5aA-Nd/?taken-by=gerritwgong

 





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In each of our lives things happen that make us stop and consider what is most important. A heart attack, a near drowning, a suicide—the sudden jolt of death, injury, or major changes make us seek at-one-ment. At these tender moments, the four things that matter most find expression as “thank you,” “I love you,” “please forgive me,” and “I forgive you” (see Ira Byock, The Four Things That Matter Most [2004], 3). . Each of these phrases is an echo of the Atonement. In each we feel our Savior’s love for us as we extend His love and forgiveness to others. Each eases pain, offers hope and comfort, and reconciles injustices and hurts that come from living in a world of sticks and stones. . And we don’t have to wait for death or trauma. The Savior’s Atonement can infuse our role relationships, experiences, and knowledge right now. Our lives become richer, more peaceful, and more whole as we say with all our hearts “thank you,” “I love you,” “please forgive me,” and “I forgive you.”

A post shared by  Gerrit W. Gong (@gerritwgong) on


Earlier this month, Elder Gong shared an experience he had when small promptings prepared him for a trial to come. He said, “As I looked back, I realized I had been lovingly prepared in advance. Earlier small promptings regarding plane tickets and running errands later provided great comfort.” 

 





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Promptings sometimes comfort or prepare us for things Heavenly Father knows are coming. . Some years ago I awoke one morning with a clear but curious impression: I should use frequent-flier miles to upgrade my parents’ airplane tickets for their visit to our family in Virginia. I had the tickets upgraded, then forgot completely about it. . During the visit my father was very tired one afternoon but wanted to go with me as I ran errands. Although I thought he should really stay and rest, I happily agreed for us to run the errands together. Somewhere between the laundry and the grocery store, I had a quiet feeling my father would not visit again. . A few months later I was attending a business conference in Kyoto, Japan, when I received word my father had unexpectedly died. I cried for many days. But as I looked back, I realized I had been lovingly prepared in advance. Earlier small promptings regarding plane tickets and running errands later provided great comfort.

A post shared by  Gerrit W. Gong (@gerritwgong) on


Here are the Twitter messages he shared over the past six months: 

A post shared by  Gerrit W. Gong (@gerritwgong) on


As general conference approaches, take time to review the talks and social media posts by all Church leaders. These can spiritually prepare you to hear their new messages and receive personal revelation. 

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