57978

We asked, you answered: 20+ hilariously sweet and funny things kids prayed for

by | Jul. 23, 2020

Fun

Editor’s note: “We asked, you answered” highlights memorable responses to discussion questions posed on LDS Living’s social media accounts. Follow along on Facebook and Instagram @ldsliving to contribute. 

A child learning to pray is a little bit of everything: sweet, tender, and sometimes outright funny. We recently asked our Instagram followers what funny things they’ve heard children pray for. From hilarious to heartwarming, you don’t want to miss any of the responses on this list.

Responses have been edited for clarity and brevity.

Some creative prayers seem to have come from moments when a child didn’t quite say what they meant to say.

One of my sons prayed that he could get “bath tubbed.” He meant to say “baptized.”

Our son, when about 4 years old, knew that his cousin and grandparents were on missions. He prayed that they wouldn’t fall off their missions.

My son at five said, while praying, “Please bless the prophet and his two sidekicks.” Then he looked at me and said, “Is that right, Mom?” 

“Bless the world with peas.”

On a slightly more mischievous note, some kids clearly had something in mind they wanted and thought asking for it in a prayer might be their best chance of getting it.

My nephew prayed that we could have juice with dinner. After that, my mom got up and got him some juice. Then his little sister decided to say a prayer too, and she prayed for soda.

When my daughter was about 4 years old, she said, “Please help mom 'cause she is REALLY BUGGING me!”

Once, our son said the prayer at the beginning of family home evening and said, “Please bless us that the activity won’t be incredibly boring.”

“Please bless I don’t have to eat this—it looks disgusting.”

My 5-year-old was saying the prayer before eating his lunch. He said he was grateful for lots and lots of food and prayed to continue to have lots and lots of food. Then he said, “But we don’t need any more broccoli.”

One of my sons prayed when he was age 2 that “candy would be in my mouth.”

My daughter once prayed to be turned into a Pegasus unicorn during family prayer. She said she would give us all rides if it happened.

Some responses offer a peek into the funny things kids worry about during the day.

“That Darth Vader and the Storm Troopers would be righteous and not bad.”

My brother regularly prayed for blessings on the lawnmower.

My 5-year-old prays for the Lamanites almost every day.

Our young son prayed that we would not say bad words. Then he said, “Like. . .” and proceeded to list several bad words we shouldn’t say.

"That Pokémon would be real."

In my Sunbeam class on Sunday, a little boy prayed for all the Disney princesses by name! It was hilarious!

This week my granddaughter prayed that her 2-year-old brother would not turn into a fire-breathing dragon!

“Please bless that the dinosaurs will come back to life, but just the leaf eaters.”

And of course, some the responses displayed the sweet innocence of a child.

My daughter, when she was 5 years old, prayed “that our niceness will stay, and our meanness will go away.” 

When one of our daughters was 4 years old, she asked for “a Heavenly Father phone and a Jesus phone, so I can call them and talk to them.”

When we were out exploring southern Utah in our truck, we got stuck. That’s when our 8-year-old foster daughter, who was new to praying, prayed out loud for Heavenly Father to send Superman and come get us out!

My son, when he was 4 years old, prayed that “all the puppies would get homes.” Then a few days later, a lady from church called me to ask if we wanted a puppy. We ended up getting that puppy.

When my daughter prayed for the missionaries she said, “Please [bless] the missionaries that they can, um, have lots of dinners.” I guess we need to talk about what missionaries actually do!

► You may also like: This Australian ward held a virtual Primary talent show. The results are too adorable to miss

Lead image courtesy of Shutterstock.
Profile

Emily Abel

Emily first found her love for storytelling as an editorial intern at LDS Living. She recently returned as a content writer and loves that her job is to highlight the meaningful in life. Emily is a graduate of Utah State University in English. Hiking trails, dance studios, and behind the cover of a good book are some of her favorite places to be.

Comments and feedback can be sent to feedback@ldsliving.com